Marketing Terms and Phrases

Here is our massive list of marketing terms and phrases along with key and important digital marketing terms. There will be continuous updates so please check back or leave a comment letting me know a few terms you are interested in learning. Heck you can even define it and I will use it on the list!


A/B Testing

This is the process of comparing two variations of a single variable to determine which performs best in order to help improve marketing efforts. This is often done in email marketing (with variations in the subject line or copy), calls-to-action (variations in colors or verbiage), and landing pages (variations in content). Outside of marketing, you can use it to determine what tastes better on a peanut butter sandwich: jelly or fluff.  – HubSpot Blog

 

A.C. Nielson

One of the two data vendors that captures store scanner data and syndicates it to sell to manufacturers for the purpose of tracking sales and market share.

 

AdSense

Google AdSense is a pay-per-click advertisement application which is available to bloggers and Web publishers as a way to generate revenue from the traffic on their sites. The owner of the site selects which ads they will host, and AdSense pays the owner each time an ad is clicked.

 

AdWords

The pay-per-click (PPC) search-engine marketing (SEM) program provided by Google.

 

Aggregator

An Internet-based tool or application which collects and curates content (often provided via RSS feeds) from many different websites and displays it in one central location. Google Reader is one popular example of an aggregator.                – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Algorithm

Mathematical rules and calculations a search engine uses to determine the rankings of the sites it has indexed. Every search engine has its own unique, proprietary algorithm that gets updated on a regular basis. Google’s famously has more than 200 major components.          – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Anchor Text

Anchors text is the text displayed on a website for a given link. Users click on the anchor text in order to get to the associated website. Links like “here” or “next” are not suitable because they do not provide any information about their destination. A visitor is not very likely to click on links like these.     – Search Metrics Glossary

 

Application Programming Interface (API)

APIs are a series of rules in computer programming, which allow an application to extract information from a service and use that information either in their own application or in data analyses. It’s kind of like a phone for applications to have conversations — an API literally “calls” one application and gets information to bring to you to use in your software. APIs facilitate the data needed to provide solutions to customer problems.       – HubSpot Blog

 

Astroturfing

“Astroturfing is the practice of masking the sponsors of a message or organization (e.g., political, advertising, religious or public relations) to make it appear as though it originates from and is supported by a grassroots participant(s).” – Wikipedia

 

Backlink

Backlinks are incoming links that refer to all links from other websites referencing the website in question. Search engines interpret a link to a website (backlink) as a recommendation for it and are geared towards providing search results from other such authoritative recommendations. The more authoritative you are on your topic, the more recommendations you will receive. In some industries, the more backlinks a website has and the better those links are, the further up the referring domain will appear in the search results. An example of strong backlinks would be links from topically relevant websites.    – Search Metrics Glossary

 

Banner Ad

Graphical image or small animation file embedded within a Web page and used for advertising, often containing a link to other sites, products, etc.        – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Blog

Short for “weblog,” this is a special kind of website for self-publishing, often done by the owner of the site (the “blogger”), but sometimes by a committee of authors who rotate by day, for example. Blogs typically record and categorize all content updates by date/time and topic for easy tracking by readers. The posts appear on a blog’s homepage in reverse-chronological order (thus the original term, “weblog”).       – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Bottom of the Funnel

Since we’re going alphabetically, the last part of the funnel process is first! So, “bottoms up,” I suppose. The bottom of the funnel refers to a stage of the buying process leads reach when they’re just about to close as new customers. They’ve identified a problem, have shopped around for possible solutions, and are very close to buying. Typically, next steps for leads at this stage are a call from a sales rep, a demo, or a free consultation — depending on what type of business is attempting to close the lead. – HubSpot Blog

 

Bounce Rate

refers to the percentage of email addresses in your subscriber list that didn’t receive your message. There are a number of reasons this can happen, including that the email address no longer exists or because the recipient’s mailbox provider marked your campaign as spam.             – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

Brand

This is the share of overall market sales taken by each brand. In the consumer field, it is usually measured by audit research on panels of retail outlets, such as that undertaken by A. C. Nielsen, and hence represents consumer purchases and not necessarily usage – although the distinction is usually not an important one. In the industrial field, it is usually a ‘guesstimate’ based on research on a limited number of customers; although in some fields government departments audit total output. -David Mercer, “Marketing – The Encyclopedic Dictionary

 

Buyer Persona

A semi-fictional representation of your ideal customer based on market research and real data about your existing customers. While it helps marketers like you define their target audience, it can also help sales reps qualify leads.                – HubSpot Blog

 

Call-to-Action

A call-to-action is a text link, button, image, or some type of web link that encourages a website visitor to visit a landing page and become of lead. Some examples of CTAs are “Subscribe Now” or “Download the Whitepaper Today.” These are important for marketers because they’re the “bait” that entices a website visitor to eventually become a lead. So, you can imagine that it’s important to convey a very enticing, valuable offer on a call-to-action to better foster visitor-to-lead conversion.              – HubSpot Blog

 

Click-Through Rate

is a measure of how many people clicked on one of the links in your email campaign. Email click-through rate is normally expressed as a percentage of the total number of people who opened your email (a 40% email click-through rate would mean that for every 10 people that opened your campaign, 4 people went on to click a link in that campaign.)          – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

Clickthrough Rate (CTR)

The percentage of your audience that advances (or clicks through) from one part of your website to the next step of your marketing campaign. As a mathematic equation, it’s the total number of clicks that your page or CTA receives divided by the number of opportunities that people had to click (ex: number of pageviews, emails sent, and so on).                – HubSpot Blog

 

Content

In relation to inbound marketing, content is a piece of information that exists for the purpose of being digested (not literally), engaged with, and shared. Content typically comes in the form of a blog, video, social media post, photo, slideshow, or podcast, although there are plenty of over types out there. From website traffic to lead conversion to customer marketing, content plays an indispensable role in a successful inbound marketing strategy.       – HubSpot Blog

 

Content Management Systems (CMS)

A web application designed to make it easy for non-technical users to create, edit, and manage a website. Helps users with content editing and more “behind-the-scenes” work like making content searchable and indexable, automatically generating navigation elements, keeping track of users and permissions, and more.          – HubSpot Blog

 

Content Optimization System (COS)

A COS is basically a CMS (Content Management System), but optimized to deliver customers the most personalized web experience possible.             – HubSpot Blog

 

Conversion Path

A conversion path is a series of website-based events that facilitate lead capture. In its most basic form, a conversion path will consist of a call-to-action (typically a button that describes an offer) that leads to a landing page with a lead capture form, which redirects to a thank you page where a content offer resides. In exchange for his or her contact information, a website visitor obtains a content offer to better help them through the buying process. If you’re still having difficulty grasping the topic based on this description, feel free to absorb it as a rabbit hunting analogy in comic form.     – HubSpot Blog

 

Conversion Rate

The percentage of people who completed a desired action on a single web page, such as filling out a form. Pages with high conversion rates are performing well, while pages with low conversion rates are performing poorly. – HubSpot Blog

 

Cost-per-Lead (CPL)

The amount it costs your marketing organization to acquire a lead. This factors heavily into CAC (customer acquisition cost), and is a metric marketers should keep a keen eye on.          – HubSpot Blog

 

Crowdsourcing

In the context of social media, this is a process used by many social bookmarking sites where individuals are allowed to vote on news stories and articles to determine their value and relevancy within the site. Related to other social media concepts such as collaboration and collective intelligence, it can also be a research tool      – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

CSS

CSS stands for Cascading Style Sheets, and it’s what gives your entire website its style, like colors, fonts, and background images. It affects the mood and tone of a web page, making it an incredibly powerful tool. It’s also what allows websites to adapt to different screen sizes and device types.          – HubSpot Blog

 

Customer Recison

Measures number of days since last purchase.

 

Del.icio.us

A popular social bookmarking site which allows members to share, store and organize their favorite online content.                – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Digg

Not as popular as it once was, Digg is a tech-centric social bookmarking and crowdsourcing site with a large, devoted audience that famously directs server-busting traffic to websites that have articles linked from its popular top rankings.              – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Ebook

Ebooks are a common type of content that many marketers use, often to help generate leads. They are generally a more long-form content type than, say, blog posts, and go into in-depth detail on a subject. Here’s an awesome ebook on how to write an ebook (so meta).       – HubSpot Blog

 

Email Conversions

is a measure of the number of conversions (purchases on your eCommerce store, signups for your product, etc) driven by your email marketing campaigns. If like most marketers, the main goal of your email marketing campaigns is to ultimately help drive sales & revenue for your business, then this metric will be very useful to you as it can give you quantifiable data on your overall return on investment. – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

Email Visits

Email visits is a measure of how many people visited your website from your email marketing campaigns. If your goal with email is to drive people to your website, then it’s a useful metric for comparing how email performs against other channels, like search engines and social media, when it comes to driving visits to your site.            – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

Engagement Rate

A popular social media metric used to describe the amount of interaction — Likes, shares, comments — a piece of content receives. Interactions like these tell you that your messages are resonating with your fans and followers.                – HubSpot Blog

 

Facebook

A dominant, free-access social-networking site which is available to companies and any person 13 years of age or older.    – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Flash

Refers to a form of video software developed by Adobe Macromedia that creates vector-based graphic animations that occupy small file sizes.          – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Flickr

A media-hosting network where users can upload and share image files. It is the largest photo-storage and photo-sharing site on the Web.               – Fathom Delivers Glossary

Forum

An area on a website (or an entire website) dedicated to user conversation through written comments and message boards, often related to customer support or fan engagement.   – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Friends

Individuals connected to one another’s profiles on a social networking site, most frequently used in association with Facebook (e.g., Facebook friends).           – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Google+

Google+ (referred to as “Google Plus”) is a social network that allows you to join and create circles in which you can mix and match family members, friends, colleagues, and fellow industry members. While you can use it much like other social networks — to publish and share content, and generate new leads — it also provides content marketers with tremendous SEO value due to the rising importance of social sharing in search engine algorithms. (It is owned by Google, after all.)             – HubSpot Blog

 

Gresham’s Law

The well-known saying, from the time of Elizabeth I, that ‘bad money drives out good’.    -David Mercer, “Marketing – The Encyclopedic Dictionary

 

Hashtag

A symbol (#) placed directly in front of a word or words to tag a post on Twitter. It is often used to group tweets by popular categories of interest and to help users follow discussion topics. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

HTML

This is short for HyperText Markup Language, a language used to write web pages. It’s at the core of every web page, regardless the complexity of a site or number of technologies involved, and provides the basic structure of the site — which is then enhanced and modified by other technologies like CSS and JavaScript.          – HubSpot Blog

 

Impression

An instance of an organic search-engine listing or sponsored ad being served on a particular Web page or an image being viewed in display advertising. In paid search, “cost-per-impression” is a common metric.     – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Inbound Link

An inbound link is a link coming from another site to your own website. “Inbound” is generally used by the person receiving the link. Websites that receive many inbound links can be more likely to rank higher in search engines. They also help folks receive referral traffic from other websites.           – HubSpot Blog

 

Inbound Marketing

Inbound marketing refers to marketing activities that draw visitors in, rather than marketers having to go out to get prospects’ attention. It’s all about earning the attention of customers, making the company easy to find online, and drawing customers to the website by producing interesting, helpful content. By aligning the content you publish with your customer’s interests, you naturally attract inbound traffic that you can then convert, close, and delight over time.      – HubSpot Blog

 

Infographic

A highly visual piece of content that is very popular among digital marketers as a way of relaying complex concepts in a simple and visual way. – HubSpot Blog

 

Instagram

Though initially a haven only for younger generations who wanted to post, edit, and share unique-looking photos, Instagram has grown into a premier social network that’s a viable opportunity for content marketers. Many businesses are taking advantage of the site by posting industry related photos that their followers and customers would enjoy seeing.        – HubSpot Blog

 

IP Address

This series of numbers and periods represents the unique numeric address for each Internet user. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

JavaScript

Mix ¾ oz coffee liqueur with one shot espresso … nah, just kidding. JavaScript is a programming language that lets web developers design interactive sites. Most of the dynamic behavior you’ll see on a web page is thanks to JavaScript, which augments a browser’s default controls and behaviors.  – HubSpot Blog

 

Key Performance Indicator (KPI)

A type of performance measurement companies use to evaluate an employee’s or an activity’s success. Marketers look at KPIs to track progress toward marketing goals, and successful marketers constantly evaluate their performance against industry standard metrics. Examples of KPIs include CAC (Customer Acquisition Cost), blog traffic sources, and homepage views. Choose KPIs that represent how your marketing and business are performing.  – HubSpot Blog

 

Keyword

“Sometimes referred to as “”keyword phrases,”” keywords are the topics that webpages get indexed for in search results by engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

Picking keywords that you’ll optimize a webpage for is a two-part effort. First, you’ll want to ensure the keyword has significant search volume and is not too difficult to rank for. Then, you’ll want to ensure it aligns with your target audience

After deciding the appropriate keywords you want to rank for, you’ll then need to optimize the appropriate pages on your website using both on-page and off-page tactics. What are those, you ask? Skip to “O” to find out — but don’t tell “L”, “M”, or “N”! ”            – HubSpot Blog

 

Landing Page

A landing page is a website page containing a form that is used for lead generation. This page revolves around a marketing offer, such as an ebook or a webinar, and serves to capture visitor information in exchange for the valuable offer. Landing pages are the gatekeepers of the conversion path and are what separates a website visitor from becoming a lead.              – HubSpot Blog

Lead Nurturing

Sometimes referred to as “drip marketing,” lead nurturing is the practice of developing a series of communications (emails, social media messages, etc.) that seek to qualify a lead, keep it engaged, and gradually push it down the sales funnel. Inbound marketing is all about delivering valuable content to the right audience — and lead nurturing helps foster this by providing contextually relevant information to a lead during different stages of the buying lifecycle.                – HubSpot Blog

 

Lifecycle Stages

These divisions serve as a way to describe the relationship you have with your audience, and can generally be broken down into three stages: awareness, evaluation, and purchase. What’s important to understand about each of these stages is that not every piece of content you create is appropriate, depending on what stage your audience might fall in at that moment. That’s why dynamic content is so great — you can serve up content that’s appropriate for whatever stage that particular visitor is in. – HubSpot Blog

Link Popularity

Link popularity refers to the number of backlinks (incoming links) that point to a given website. In contrast to domain popularity, every backlink is counted separately. For example, in a blog about cars there are 10 different entries that have links to the website of a car dealer. In this case you would count a total of 10 backlinks. Link popularity used to be an important figure for search engines. These days many search engines have switched to focus on domain popularity, which in addition to quantity provides information about the quality of the backlinks. For this reason it is important to get as many high-quality backlinks as possible, since everyone who clicks on a backlink will be directed to your website.    – Search Metrics Glossary

 

LinkedIn

A business-oriented social networking site for professionals. Much like Facebook, LinkedIn allows members to connect with other users on the network, share status updates, and participate in groups and chats, although with a career focus.    – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Long-Tail Keyword

A long-tail keyword is a very targeted search phrase that contains three or more words. It often contains a head term, which is a more generic search term, plus one or two additional words that refine the search term.            – HubSpot Blog

 

Marketing

Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.     – American Marketing Association

 

Meta Search Terms

Search terms can be included in the meta tags of any website’s HTML code. These meta search terms do not appear on the website, rather they inform search engines about the search terms that the website is optimized for. In this way you can increase the probability that a website will be found by using these search terms. However, many search engines (e.g. Google) do not take meta search terms into account when evaluating websites.       – Search Metrics Glossary

 

Meta-Description Tag

A tag on a Web page located in the heading source code containing a basic description of the page. It helps search engines categorize the page and can potentially inform users who come across the page listing in search results. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Meta-Search Engine

A search engine that does not compile its own independent results, but rather pulls data from two or more search engines, such as Dogpile.com.    – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Meta-Tags

Also called meta-data, this information found in HTML page headers used to be the bread and butter of SEO marketing tactics. Still used today despite widely perceived diminishing relevance to search-engine rankings, the most common are the “title,” “description,” and “keyword” tags (see below). – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Middle of the Funnel

This refers to the stage that a lead enters after identifying a problem. Now they’re looking to conduct further research to find a solution to the problem. Typical middle of the funnel offers include case studies or product brochures — essentially anything that brings your business into the equation as a solution to the problem the lead is looking to solve. Also, if you want to be cool, you can refer to this stage as “MOFU” for short.            – HubSpot Blog

 

Newsfeed

A news feed is an online feed full of news sources. On Facebook, the News Feed is the homepage of users’ accounts where they can see all the latest updates from their friends. (Learn all about Facebook’s News Feed here.) The news feed on Twitter is called Timeline.

 

Ning

A hosting service with a set of community-building tools that allows anyone to create a social network. Read our profile on ‘What is Ning?’

 

No-Follow Link

“Nofollow” is an append which is coded into the HTML markup of a hyperlink. It is used to prevent a search engine from indexing a link to a particular Web page. Some strategic uses of external “nofollow” are associated with link popularity management, e.g., for site owners that do not want to give full “follow” credit to links posted by users in their forums or blog comments. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Open Rate

is a measure of how many people on your email list open your campaign. It is normally expressed as a percentage of the total number of emails successfully delivered (so a 40% open rate would mean that of every 10 emails delivered to the inbox, 4 were actually opened.)                         – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

Outbound Link

Any link on a Web page ‘linking’ to an external Web page.

 

Page Description

It is possible to give a short description of the content of any given webpage (e.g. homepage, subpage). This page description is laid down in HTML code and does not appear on the website. Search engines display the page description in their search results (directly underneath the page title). If a webpage does not have a page description, text from the page will often appear instead. In the search results, the search term should be emphasized in bold. Ideally the page description should contain the search term for which the website has been optimized.   – Search Metrics Glossary

 

Page Rank

A former proprietary method of Google (now disavowed) for measuring the popularity of a Web page. Much-debated in the SEO community, the measurement is believed to be influenced chiefly by the number and quality of inbound and outbound links associated with a given page. Updated infrequently, this rank was indicated as a number between 1 and 10 most commonly displayed in a green bar chart in the Google toolbar add-on for browsers. The SEO community consensus opinion is that the measurement was nothing more than Google’s incomplete assessment of the relative strength of a website.            – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Page Title

Every webpage (e.g. homepage, subpage) has its own title. The page title is laid out in HTML code and appears in the title bar of the browser. Search engines display page titles in their search results. In addition, search engines use page titles in order to recognize what information the website contains. Ideally page titles should include the search term for which the website has been optimized.           – Search Metrics Glossary

 

Pay-per-Click (PPC)

The amount of money spent to get a digital advertisement clicked. Also an internet advertising model where advertisers pay a publisher (usually a search engine, social media site, or website owner) a certain amount of money every time their ad is clicked. For search engines, PPC ads display an advertisement when someone searches for a keyword that matches the advertiser’s keyword list, which they submit to the search engine ahead of time.           – HubSpot Blog

 

Pinterest

Pinterest is a visual social network typically used by ecommerce marketers, but not without its fair share of top-notch B2B and B2C content marketers. Businesses and consumers alike use the website to post images and photos they like so fellow users can repin (share) that content.    – HubSpot Blog

 

Podcast

A series of audio or video content which can be downloaded and listened to/viewed offline (or a particular episode in that series, e.g. podcast #6 of The Sporkful). A podcast is essentially an asynchronous Internet version of a “broadcast,” but to a very specific audience of willing subscribers. Podcasts are sometimes created to provide stand-alone copies of existing radio or television programming (such as daily/weekly shows), but they may also consist of entirely unique content intended for devoted Web-based subscribers.    – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

QR Code

A QR code (abbreviated from Quick Response code) is a specific matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) that is readable by dedicated QR barcode readers and camera telephones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded may be text, URL, or other data. It also starts with “Q,” which is a rarity with marketing-related terms.         – HubSpot Blog

 

Responsive Design

This is the practice of developing a website that adapts accordingly to how someone is viewing it. Instead of building a separate, distinct website for each specific device it could be viewed on, the site recognizes the device that your visitor is using and automatically generates a page that is responsive to the device the content is being viewed on — making websites always appear optimized for screens of any dimension. – HubSpot Blog

 

Retweet

A re-posting of a tweet posted by another user on Twitter.

 

Robots.txt

A small text file included on a website that directs a search engine to include/exclude specific pages from its index. It can be submitted manually to search engines to ensure the latest version is followed regardless of the “crawl cycle.”                – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

RSS

“Really simple syndication” is the process by which content such as blog posts or podcasts can be updated regularly and syndicated to subscribers in feeds. RSS feeds enable users to access content updates from various outlets—e.g. their favorite blogs, news sites, and digital audio/video providers—all in one central location.       – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Search Engine

A website that allows users to search the Web for specific information by entering keywords. Can include paid or organic listings of websites and sometimes specific images, products, videos, music, place entries or other enhanced results. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Short for search engine optimization, the process of increasing the number of visitors to a Web site by achieving high rank in the search results of a search engine. The higher a Web site ranks in the results of a search, the greater the chance that users will visit the site. It is common practice for Internet users to not click past the first few pages of search results, therefore high rank in SERPs is essential for obtaining traffic for a site. SEO helps to ensure that a site is accessible to a search engine and improves the chances that the site will be indexed and favorably ranked by the search engine.                   – MOZ

 

SERP

Search Engine Results Page

 

Snapchat

A social app that allows users to send and receive time-sensitive photos and videos known as “snaps,” which are hidden from the recipients once the time limit expires. (Note: Images and videos still remain on the Snapchat server). Users can add text and drawings to their snaps and control the list of recipients in which they send them to.          – HubSpot Blog

 

Social Handle

Your user identifier used on certain social media platforms. (ie @cobomktg – Twitter handle)

 

Social Media

Refers to all online tools and places that are available for users to generate content and communicate through the Internet. These media include blogs, social networks, file-hosting sites and bookmarking sites, among others.       – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Social Network

A site or community on the Internet where members can interact with one another and share content. This term is more or less used interchangeably with “social media” in reference to Internet marketing.            – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Tag

A keyword (often in a string) which is attached to a blog post, tweet (see “hashtag”), social bookmark or media file. Tags help categorize content by subject. – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Title Tag

form of meta-data used by search engines to categorize Web pages by title. Search-engine algorithms traditionally value title tags to determine/categorize page content.   – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Top of the Funnel

Sometimes called “TOFU”, top of the funnel refers to the very first stage of the buying process. Leads at this stage are just identifying a problem that they have and are looking for more information. As such, an inbound marketer will want to create helpful content that aids leads in identifying this problem and providing next steps toward a solution. TOFU is also very tasty in certain Thai dishes.      – HubSpot Blog

 

Tweet

A “tweet” is the special name for an entry made on the microblogging site, Twitter. Up to 140 characters long, tweets can consist of random status updates, news, commentary, or anything an individual wants to communicate to followers at that moment, including personal messages to other users or groups and links to external content (articles, photos, videos). – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Twitter

Twitter is a microblogging platform which allows users to create profiles, share short updates on a timeline, and engage with other users, much like a social-networking site.        – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Unique Visitor

A person who visits a website more than once within a period of time. Marketers use this term in contrast with overall site visits to track the amount of traffic on their website. If only one person visits a webpage 30 times, then that web page has one UV and 30 total site visits. – HubSpot Blog

 

Unsubscribe Rate

is a measure of how many people unsubscribed from your email list from that particular campaign. Unsubscribe rate is normally expressed as a percentage of the total number of people who received your campaign (so a 2% unsubscribe rate would mean that for every 100 people that received your campaign, 2 people decided to click the unsubscribe button and remove themselves from your email list.)       – Campaign Monitor, Resources

 

URL

Uniform Resource Locator – AKA Web Address

Webinar

A Web-based seminar containing audio and video, often in the form of a slide deck.          – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

Web 2.0

Is characterized by websites, which encourage user interaction. – MOZ

Website

A website is a set of interconnected webpages, usually including a homepage, generally located on the same server, and prepared and maintained as a collection of information by a person, group, or organization. An inbound marketer should structure a website like a dynamic, multi-dimensional entity that can be used to attract relevant website visitors, convert those visitors into leads, and close those leads into customers. Otherwise, it’s just a brochure — and let’s be honest — could you really use another brochure?               – HubSpot Blog

 

Whitepages

 

Wiki

Refers to any page or collection of pages on the Internet or an intranet that can be easily edited by the public or a select group of registered visitors. Wikis are examples of collaboration. See “Wikipedia,” the most famous example of a wiki, below.                    – Fathom Delivers Glossary

Wikipedia

A free, open-source, multilingual encyclopedia consisting of heavily edited user-generated content on topics of nearly every sort. The largest encyclopedia in the world, Wikipedia is administered by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit group. One defining characteristic of Wikipedia is its insistence on not publishing original research, but rather being an authoritative clearinghouse of citations of other material already published on the Web.                              – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

XML Sitemap

“We couldn’t leave “X” out of the party! An XML sitemap is a file of code that lives on your web server and lists all of the relevant URLs that are in the structure of your website. It’s kind of like a “”floor plan”” for the site, which especially comes in handy whenever the site gets changed. It also helps search engine web crawlers determine the structure of the site so they can crawl it more intelligently.

Sitemaps don’t guarantee all links will be crawled, and being crawled does not guarantee indexing. However, a sitemap is still the best insurance for getting a search engine to learn about your entire site. It’s sort of like saying “Hey, Google — check out this fine website.””

– HubSpot Blog

 

YouTube

The most popular video-hosting and video-sharing site, it is also currently the largest search engine after Google (incidentally, also owned by Google). Users can view, upload and comment on video content for no charge, though companies can pay for sponsored promotion of videos or to have enhanced branding and design capabilities on their profile pages, known as “channels.”         – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

301 Redirect

Code meaning “moved permanently,” used to point browsers, spiders, etc. to the correct location of a missing or renamed URL. Pages marked with such a code will automatically redirect to another URL.               – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

400 Bad Request

the 400 Bad Request error page shows up. It usually happens when Whenever the client sends a request the server is unable to understand, the data sent by the browser doesn’t respect the rules of the HTTP protocol, so the web server is clueless about how to process a request containing a malformed syntax.            – HongKiat Blog

 

401 Authorization Required

When there’s a password-protected web page behind the client’s request, the server responds with a 401 Authorization Required code. 401 doesn’t return a classical error message at once, but a popup that asks the user to provide a login-password combination.  – HongKiat Blog

 

403 Forbidden

You can encounter the 403 Forbidden error page when the server understands the client’s request clearly, but for some reasons refuses to fulfil it. This is neither a malformation nor an authorization problem. By returning the 403 status code the server basically rejects the client with a big loud “No” without any explanation    – HongKiat Blog

 

404 Error

“File not found” code for a Web page that displays when a user attempts to access a URL that has been moved, renamed or no longer exists. Used as a template for missing or deleted pages, designing a custom “404 page” in a user-friendly way can help people stay engaged with your site even when a given page turns up blank.     – Fathom Delivers Glossary

 

408 Request Time-Out

When the request of the client takes too long, the server times out, closes the connection, and the browser displays a 408 Request Time-Out error message. The time-out happens because the server didn’t receive a complete request from the client within the timeframe it was prepared to wait. Persistent 408 errors can occur because of the heavy workload on either the server or on the client’s system. – HongKiat Blog

 

410 Gone

The 410 Gone error page is very close to the well-known 404. Both mean that the server doesn’t find the requested file, but while 404 suggests that the target file may be available somewhere on the server, 410 indicates a permanent condition.            – HongKiat Blog

 

4Ps

In terms of the marketing mix, many business schools use the framework of the 4Ps (as proposed by E. Jerome McCarthy) to conveniently (and perhaps arbitrarily) group these activities into related areas: Product, Price, Place, Promotion.         -David Mercer, “Marketing – The Encyclopedic Dictionary

 

500 Internal Server Error

Internal Server Error is the most well-known server error, as it’s used whenever the server encounters an unexpected condition that prevents it from fulfilling the client’s request. The 500 error code is a generic one, it’s returned when no other server-side 5XX error codes make any sense.        – HongKiat Blog

 

502 Bad Gateway

The 502 error message represents a communication problem between two servers. It occurs when the client connects to a server acting as a gateway or a proxy that needs to access an upstream server that provides additional service to it. The other server is located higher in the server hierarchy. It can be for example an Apache web server that’s accessed by a proxy server, or the name server of a large internet service provider that’s accessed by a local name server.  – HongKiat Blog

 

503 Service Temporarily Unavailable

You see the Service Temporarily Unavailable (sometimes Out of Resources) message any time there’s a temporary overload on the server, or when it’s going through a scheduled maintenance. The 503 error code means that the web server is currently not available. This is usually a temporary condition that will be resolved after some delay.         – HongKiat Blog

 

504 Gateway Time-Out

There is a server-server communication problem behind the Gateway Time-Out error message, just like behind the 502 Bad Gateway error code. When the 504 status code is returned there’s also a higher-level server in the background that is supposed to send data to the server that is connected to our client. In this case the lower-level server doesn’t receive a timely response from the upstream server it accessed.   – HongKiat Blog


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